Monthly Archives: November 2011

Blavatar Perrelet Turbine Hentai Erotic Limited Edition Watch

Perrelet has just announced a few limited edition erotic watches based on the original Turbine. These are done in a Japanese anime style, which is often referred to as “hentai” when it deals with pornographic or erotic art. This cartoon erotic art is quite popular and has origins going back to the 19th century or earlier. Using the spinning turbine concept on the dial, the images are placed on the dial and only really visible when the turbine (activated by wrist movement) is spinning quickly. … Perrelet has just announced a few limited edition erotic watches based on the original Turbine. These are done in a Japanese anime style, which is often referred to as “hentai” when it deals with pornographic or erotic art. This cartoon erotic art is quite popular and has origins going back to the 19th century or earlier. Using the spinning turbine concept on the dial, the images are placed on the dial and only really visible when the turbine (activated by wrist movement) is spinning quickly. … – – more Read

©ourtesy of CellarDoor’s Blog

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Blavatar Why I Hate Almost Everyone (Part 4): Bad Manners

OK, right off the bat I just want to say that I am not one of those pedantic, painstakingly persnickety people who pontificate on the proper placement of the oyster fork (to the right of, or – my personal preference - resting with the tines in the dinner spoon on the right side of the dinner plate) or how gracefully to get rid of an olive pit that is in your mouth (if you put the olive into your mouth with a spoon, then gently spit the pit back into the spoon and place the pit on your plate). … OK, right off the bat I just want to say that I am not one of those pedantic, painstakingly persnickety people who pontificate on the proper placement of the oyster fork (to the right of, or – my personal preference – resting with the tines in the dinner spoon on the right side of the dinner plate) or how gracefully to get rid of an olive pit that is in your mouth (if you put the olive into your mouth with a spoon, then gently spit the pit back into the spoon and place the pit on your plate). …  — continue Read

©ourtesy of Vampyre Fangs

Nude study drawing

Another Oldie by  Eggshells

Another older study, one of the first couple using white conte. I have some funny things planned for tomorrow, we’ll see.

 

Chicas

Dames by  thekevinchen

Man about town

Postcards and Cover of MAN ABOUT TOWN #9, Living the High Life—The Space Issue, edited by Philip Utz; creative direction by M/M Paris. [ courtesy of businessoffashion: ]

Thank You KEN RUSSELL R.I.P.

Champagne. Soap bubbles. Baked beans. Melted bon-bons. Four images - all part and parcel of perhaps the most famous scene he ever committed to celluloid (which, in this instance, is definitely saying something grand) - that seemingly conjure up so much of the universe of peerless British stage and film director Ken Russell. With or without Ann-Margret in a white leather cat-suit, Russell’s TOMMY is one of the most unique and enduring movie musicals of the later half of the twentieth century and his other music-based films provide a plethora of information and insight (not all of it factual and much of it often quite admittedly wrongheaded) - so, for those alone, Russell is due much praise as far as theatre fans are concerned. Yet, with WOMEN IN LOVE, Russell mastered a quite different milieu - that of Victorian sexual politics - and brought the leading lady of that picture to both an Oscar nomination (which Ann-Margret also received for TOMMY) and a win; Glenda Jackson - a frequent Russell collaborator - taking top honors for her work and later re-teaming with Russell throughout her film career. Look no further than Russell’s adaptation of Oscar Wilde's SALOME - or even Jackson’s cameo in THE BOY FRIEND - for more of their palpable, playful, endlessly enjoyable onscreen rapport. So, too, did Ken Russell give Kathleen Turner and Theresa Russell (no relation) the roles of their careers with CRIMES OF PASSION and WHORE, respectively, and that’s to say nothing of his long-standing and loving actor-director relationship with Oliver Reed, whose best work resides in Russell’s still-banned Catholicism and exorcism consideration, THE DEVILS. Both an actor’s director and a director’s director, Russell was always passionately committed to his vision for the potential property and that was both a gift and a curse - as is clear to see in this collection of clips. The eccentricities and excesses may be overwhelming for some, but, over the course of his fifty-year career, Ken Russell broke down barriers and created films that we may enjoy, analyze, debate and cherish for many decades to come.  Read more: http://broadwayworld.com/article/SOUND-OFF-Special-Edition-A-Ken-Russell-Retrospective-20111128#ixzz1f95yXTJb“We will ALL miss him for his gifts & talents as your quintessential Film Directors, thanks Ken” ———————–

Champagne. Soap bubbles. Baked beans. Melted bon-bons. Four images – all part and parcel of perhaps the most famous scene he ever committed to celluloid (which, in this instance, is definitely saying something grand) – that seemingly conjure up so much of the universe of peerless British stage and film director Ken Russell. With or without Ann-Margret in a white leather cat-suit, Russell’s TOMMY is one of the most unique and enduring movie musicals of the later half of the twentieth century and his other music-based films provide a plethora of information and insight (not all of it factual and much of it often quite admittedly wrongheaded) – so, for those alone, Russell is due much praise as far as theatre fans are concerned.  — Go HERE to Read about & View some of Ken’s Best

Imperfection

View ‘The 75 Best LIFE Photos’

An Air Force pilot with patterns of light covering his face and shoulders is measured, like a contour map, for a perfectly fitted flight helmet in this 1954 Ralph Morse photo. Morse, whose technical brilliance so often meshed with his eye for the startling, striking image, managed in this portrait to perfectly illustrate the cover story of the December 6, 1954, issue of LIFE: a report titled, simply, "Jet Age Man."An Air Force pilot with patterns of light covering his face and shoulders is measured, like a contour map, for a perfectly fitted flight helmet in this 1954 Ralph Morse photo. Morse, whose technical brilliance so often meshed with his eye for the startling, striking image, managed in this portrait to perfectly illustrate the cover story of the December 6, 1954, issue of LIFE: a report titled, simply, “Jet Age Man.” – – view lots more here

Cinema

24th November, 2011