Tag Archives: Paris

Vintage ‘vixens’ and ‘nostalgic’ Villains

©ourtesy of  peggypepper vintagegal & stayoverthere

Les Vampires – The Deadly Ring/La Bague qui tue (1915)

Les Vampires is a 1915–16 French silent crime serial film written and directed by Louis Feuillade. Set in Paris, it stars Édouard Mathé, Musidora and Marcel Lévesque. The main characters are a journalist and his friend who become involved in trying to uncover and stop a bizarre underground Apache gang, known as The Vampires (who are not the mythological beings their name suggests). The serial consists of ten episodes, which vary greatly in length. Being roughly 7 hours long, it is considered one of the longest films ever made. It was produced and distributed by Feuillade’s company Gaumont. Due to its stylistic similarities with Feuillade’s other crime serials Fantômas and Judex, the three are often considered a trilogy. – – read more on Wikipedia

Transgender Women 50’s Paris

©ourtesy of shoutinghorse & BuzzFeed Staff Sarah Karlan

trannys from the 50s

Beautiful Photography Collection Captures Transgender Women In 1950s Paris

When Christer Strömholm traveled to Paris in late 1950s, he left with a captivating portrait of the trans women who made a living in the city’s red-light district.  A little-known Swedish photographer, Christer Strömholm, visited Paris to experiment with a new style of night-time street photography. He immersed himself in the red-light district of Place Blanche where he beautifully captured through his lens the wide variety of young trans women struggling to make a living.

In 1983, Strömholm published his book, Les Amies de Place Blanche, with the photographs from his visit.

Strömholm would go on to became known as the “father” of Swedish photography. Recently the photographs in Les Amies de Place Blanche were re-released in a new version of the original book, complete with essays and anecdotes.

You can view the full collection here.

Inside he wrote a powerful introduction: Source:  © C.Strömholm/ Agence VU  /  via: messynessychic.com

 

The evolution of pop cans from 1950 to today.

©ourtesy of wheelsupinthirty and stayoverthere

7-up coca cola DrPepper orangeCrush Pepsi

Here are what the cans for six brands of soda have looked like over the last 50 years.

Visit boldpost for some discussion and analysis of each…!

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Church of San Giovanni Battista

Pattern Inspired

Click to visit the original postThis is the inside of the Church of San Giovanni Battista in Mogno by Mario Botta.  I just love all the different angles and how the stripes come together in different places and different directions.  I definitely want to make a pattern inspired by this room! Peace & Delight, ©ourtesy of Bel Kazan

Warhol Inspired Springtime

©ourtesy of Ldn.

This lesser known Warhol series titled Sunset seems like an afterthought at the MoMA (NYC, USA) as it’s located near the washrooms. I took this snap and realised this season’s spring fashion must have been inspired by Andy’s 1972 colour palette and so am I! Let’s dream Paris and a peachy rosé, confetti cherry blossoms and key lime pie. Clockwise: Ally Capellino tote  /  my air plant, blooming  / summer-is-ending-in-Oz-sales at Gorman  /  East London Furniture coffee table – – Read more

Bohemian Czech

©A Czech bohemian in Paris from  absinthefiend

Click to visit the original post

Viktor Oliva (1861-1928)  is one of the very few artists (or indeed, individuals) who can lay claim to being Bohemian by birth, in that he was actually born in Nové Strašecí, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary. Take that, 21st century hipsters. Having traveled to Paris in 1888 to become part of the art movement and “Bohemian Parisian” community there, Oliva doubled down on his credibility as a true Bohemian artist, and then, while developing a passion for hot air ballooning, of all things, he pulled … – – Read more

Mrs. Simpson is a ‘Fashionista’

Marge Simpson‘ goes to Paris for some HAUTE COUTURE… Chanel no less! You go girl. ©ourtesy of howtotalktogirlsatparties

‘Man Ray’ & His Gal at the time …

Model Adrienne Fidelin with her lover, the iconic photographer Man Ray in the 1930s.

©ourtesy of NYtimes & vintageblackglamour reblogged vintageblackglamour:

The story begins in Paris around 1936, when a young dancer from Guadeloupe named Adrienne Fidelin met Man Ray. He was 46 and, judging from pictures of her at the time, she was in her mid-20s. An enchanting, high-spirited beauty, Fidelin — who was known as Ady — became Man Ray’s lover, model and muse. The exact circumstances of their meeting, as with many details of her life, remain elusive. What is known is that she was dancing with a French company with ties to Guadeloupe and that the two were inseparable. Fidelin met Man Ray at the height of the Surrealist movement and was quickly embraced by his close-knit circle of artist and writer friends.

Legends of ‘Voguing’ and the ‘House Ballroom Scene’ of New York City 1989-92

Shown: Willi Ninja in his studio, 1989. Willi, considered a pioneering godfather of voguing became one of the scene's biggest mainstream successes, featuring in Malcolm McLaren's vogue-inspired hit Deep in Vogue and going on to coach many supermodels in the art of runway walking. Without him it's unlikely Madonna would have touched upon Vogue in 1990. The House of Ninja was founded with the aim of mixing Asian influences with voguing. Willi died in 2006Shown: Willi Ninja in his studio, 1989. Willi, considered a pioneering godfather of voguing became one of the scene’s biggest mainstream successes, featuring in Malcolm McLaren’s vogue-inspired hit Deep in Vogue and going on to coach many supermodels in the art of runway walking. Without him it’s unlikely Madonna would have touched upon Vogue in 1990. The House of Ninja was founded with the aim of mixing Asian influences with voguing. Willi died in 2006. Voguing was made popular in the late 80s and early 90s thanks to Madonna’s number one hit and the New York ballroom film Paris is Burning. But behind the scenes, photographer Chantal Regnault followed the predominantly African-American and Latin gay scene at its height between 1989-1992, capturing the energy of balls where men competed against one another, and the ‘houses’ that took inspiration from fashion labels… read & see MORE   &  Read a Q&A with Chantal Regnault