Tag Archives: African American

Longtime California black-owned bookstore closes

©ourtesy of  Associated Press | Terry Collins

Marcus Bookstore SFSAN FRANCISCO — One of the oldest black-owned bookstores in the nation has been evicted from its longtime home in a historic San Francisco neighborhood. The co-owners of Marcus Book Stores in the Fillmore District said in an open letter this week that the property owner changed the locks after they fell behind on rent payments. The store has been shuttered since Tuesday.WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 2:<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
A building housing a strip club collapses, on May, 02, 2014 in Washington, DC.<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
(Photo by Bill O’Leary/The Washington Post)” width=”296″ height=”206″ /> The bookstore, which emerged as a pillar in the black community since its opening in the area once nicknamed “The Harlem of the West,” celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2010. It was named after early 20th century black nationalist Marcus Garvey and has been at its current location since the early 1980s. The bookstore outlasted the uprooting of numerous black owned businesses in the area in the 1970s because of eminent domain, and it hosted celebrity authors, including Oprah Winfrey and Maya Angelou. Co-owners Tamiko, Greg and Karen Johnson have spent a year and half fundraising to buy the Victorian building where the store is located. Last year, they reached an agreement with the building’s owners to raise $2.6 million to buy the property.</p><br />
<p>The family fell about $750,000 short at a February deadline. “Though by any standards that would have been more than enough for a down payment, the (owners) refused the $1.85 million start and filed for eviction,” the family wrote. They also thought they would get a reprieve after city leaders designated the bookstore’s location a historic landmark earlier this year. Black community leaders say the city, which has seen nearly a 40 percent decrease in its African-American population between 1990 and 2010, should help. The Rev. Amos Brown, president of the San Francisco NAACP, told the <a href=San Francisco Examiner on Friday that it’s another example of how blacks are treated in the city. “You can’t deal with this bookstore without dealing with the bigger sickness,” Brown said. “So, you can’t deal with Marcus alone without looking at the conditions, the public policy that created the conditions for the black community to be torn asunder.” City Supervisor London Breed, who represents the district, said she is optimistic that the building’s owners will have a change of heart.

“We’ve been trying to find ways to save the bookstore because this is about so much more than just money,” Breed said. “This is a real devastating blow, not only for the San Francisco community, but the entire Bay Area.”

Follow Terry Collins on Twitter at @aptcollins

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Black Pop Culture Influence.

Is it a Racist Corporate Fabrication?

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Today’s popular Black culture, as seen in mainstream media, is a corporate fabrication: a caricature born from the mind of narrow minded white executives whose racism and bias created an image of Black people based off their stereotypes, fears, and fantasies. And sadly, for too long have so many willingly played the part while impressionable minds, young and old, have accepted this as who they are; who Black people are.

And all for what? Money? 

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Artist: P.blackk …by lexrightbrain

There is a lot of underground artist on the come up but can they rap and do art? P.Blackk can. This Columbus MC does a good job with this digital painting. Personally I can easily identify with this, being African American  5`11 and 220 pounds intimidation is something I have become accustom to. You can check out his tumblr for more.  There is a lot of underground artist on the come up but can they rap and do art? P.Blackk can. This Columbus MC does a good job with this digital painting. Personally I can easily identify with this, being African American  5`11 and 220 pounds intimidation is something I have become accustom to. You can check out his tumblr for more.…. by lexrightbrain

The Gullah “geechee” People are part of America

Many Embraced African Roots

The Gullah are African Americans who live in the Lowcountry region of South Carolina and Georgia, which includes both the coastal plain and the Sea Islands. Historically, the Gullah region once extended north to the Cape Fear area on the coast of North Carolina and south to the vicinity of Jacksonville on the coast of Florida; but today the Gullah area is confined to the South Carolina and Georgia Lowcountry. The Gullah people and their language are also called Geechee, which some scholars speculate is related to the Ogeechee River near Savannah, Georgia. The term "Geechee" is an emic term used by speakers (and can have a derogatory connotation depending on usage) and "Gullah" is a term that was generally used by outsiders but that has become a way for speakers to formally identify themselves and their language.  The Gullah are known for preserving more of their African linguistic and cultural heritage than any other African-American community in the United States. They speak an English-based creole language containing many African loanwords and significant influences from African languages in grammar and sentence structure. The Gullah language is related to Jamaican Creole, Barbadian Dialect, Bahamian Dialect, and the Krio language of Sierra Leone in West Africa. Gullah storytelling, cuisine, music, folk beliefs, crafts, farming and fishing traditions, all exhibit strong influences from West and Central African cultures.

Many African-Americans and West Indians live in the United States not ever knowing or being aware that their roots are that of the “Gullah” People. These group of People were able to embrace their “African” roots during times when it was forbidden. The Gullah are African Americans who live in the Lowcountry region of South Carolina and Georgia, which includes both the coastal plain and the Sea Islands. Historically, the Gullah region once extended north to the Cape Fear area on the coast of North Carolina and south to the vicinity of Jacksonville on the coast of Florida; but today the Gullah area is confined to the South Carolina and Georgia Lowcountry. The Gullah people and their language are also called Geechee, which some scholars speculate is related to the Ogeechee River near Savannah, Georgia. The term “Geechee” is an emic term used by speakers (and can have a derogatory connotation depending on usage) and “Gullah” is a term that was generally used by outsiders but that has become a way for speakers to formally identify themselves and their language. The Gullah are known for preserving more of their African linguistic and cultural heritage than any other African-American community in the United States. They speak an English-based creole language containing many African loanwords and significant influences from African languages in grammar and sentence structure. The Gullah language is related to Jamaican Creole, Barbadian Dialect, Bahamian Dialect, and the Krio language of Sierra Leone in West Africa. Gullah storytelling, cuisine, music, folk beliefs, crafts, farming and fishing traditions, all exhibit strong influences from West and Central African cultures.

…find out more CLICK

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