Transgender Women 50’s Paris

©ourtesy of shoutinghorse & BuzzFeed Staff Sarah Karlan

trannys from the 50s

Beautiful Photography Collection Captures Transgender Women In 1950s Paris

When Christer Strömholm traveled to Paris in late 1950s, he left with a captivating portrait of the trans women who made a living in the city’s red-light district.  A little-known Swedish photographer, Christer Strömholm, visited Paris to experiment with a new style of night-time street photography. He immersed himself in the red-light district of Place Blanche where he beautifully captured through his lens the wide variety of young trans women struggling to make a living.

In 1983, Strömholm published his book, Les Amies de Place Blanche, with the photographs from his visit.

Strömholm would go on to became known as the “father” of Swedish photography. Recently the photographs in Les Amies de Place Blanche were re-released in a new version of the original book, complete with essays and anecdotes.

You can view the full collection here.

Inside he wrote a powerful introduction: Source:  © C.Strömholm/ Agence VU  /  via: messynessychic.com

 

A little-known Swedish photographer, Christer Strömholm, visited Paris to experiment with a new style of night-time street photography. He immersed himself in the red-light district of Place Blanche where he beautifully captured through his lens the wide variety of young trans women struggling to make a living.

In 1983, Strömholm published his book, Les Amies de Place Blanche, with the photographs from his visit.

Inside he wrote a powerful introduction:

 

 

“This is a book about insecurity. A portrayal of those living a different life in the big city of Paris, of people who endured the roughness of the streets.”

 

 

“This is a book about humiliation, about the smell of whores and night life in cafés.”

 

 

“This is a book about the quest for self-identity, about the right to live, about the right to own and control one’s own body.”

 

 

“This is also a book about friendship, an account of the life we lived in the place Blanche and place Pigalle neighborhood. Its market, its boulevard and the small hotels we resided in.”

 

 

“These are images from another time. A time when de Gaulle was president and France was at war against Algeria.These are images of people whose lives I shared and whom I think I understood.”

 

 

“These are images of women—biologically born as men—that we call ‘transsexuals.’ As for me, I call them ‘my friends of place Blanche.’ This friendship started here, in the early 60s and it still continues.”

 

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9 responses to “Transgender Women 50’s Paris

  1. Pingback: Parsoni’s “The CleverC” | Surphac Unplugged

  2. Reblogged this on Adam from Norway's Main Blog and commented:
    WOW! … OUAHHH !

    Like

  3. What a great photo collection

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  4. Beautiful.

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  5. Hi FernOnline, thanks for introducing yourself by following our site. What an amazing collection of photographs, thanks for sharing them! If you’re on facebook we invite you to visit the RAXA Collective page. See you there.

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  6. This has got to be a most fascinating collection.

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  7. Hi fernOnline~ Thanks for following my blog! I’m just starting out so it’s really neat to have someone following Iris and Poppy! I love your eclectic collection of writing and photography. It’s quite inspiring. I really love this piece. It reminds me of a young transgender girl I worked with when I was a counselor. She used to give me fashion advice as we talked about her life on the streets. I still think about her and hope she found her way to a safe place.

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